Platinum Sombrero 5K Sponsor #8

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Sponsors keep rolling in for my first ever virtual race, the Platinum Sombrero 5K!  The eighth sponsor is SPIBelt (Small Personal Item Belt), which is exactly what the name states, a belt to use while being active to hold your phone, keys, and such.  The belts come in a variety of styles.  I have never personally used one of these belts, but judging by the photos on their site, you can store several items in one of these belts.  You can like the company on Facebook here.  One lucky Platinum Sombrero 5K participant will be getting one of their belts for free!

Sponsor #8

Sponsor #8

Platinum Sombrero 5K Sponsor #7

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The seventh sponsor for the Platinum Sombrero 5K will be the Flip Belt.  The Flip Belt is an unique running belt designed to carry your id, phones, keys, gels, and whatever else you may need out on a run.  There are numerous color options to chose from and there are sizing options that will fit the vast majority of runners.  Due to the runner specific options for the Flip Belt, this giveaway will work a little different than the other ones.  The winner of the Flip Belt will be notified via email and an email will be sent to the flip Belt as well.  The winner will have a store credit in the amount of one Flip Belt.  The winner will simply coordinate with the Flip Belt directly and then will be shipped the product straight from the manufacturer’s distribution facility.  You can go like the Flip Belt on Facebook here.

Sponsor #7 (taken from Facebook)

Sponsor #7 (taken from Facebook)

Runners for Boston

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All fellow runners in the Memphis area check this out tonight

Fleet Feet

BAA_UseRunning stores all across America are coming together Monday, April 22nd in support of Boston. Runners for Boston is a fun run to bring the community of runners together and to show our support for those affected in Boston on Monday, April 15th. Join Fleet Feet Sports Memphis together with Boston-based Saucony Running on Monday at 6pm for a 3-mile run. On the run, we encourage you to sport your past/present Boston Marathon gear, the iconic Boston Marathon blue & yellow, or any race shirt.

The run will start/finish at Fleet Feet Memphis (4530 Poplar in Laurelwood), where changing facilities and restrooms are available. We’ll end the run with an after party of food and drink to celebrate the unity of the running community and will have The Spirit of the Marathon playing on the big screen.

We’ll be accepting donations for ONE FUND BOSTON, and a $10 minimum donation gets…

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Warrior Dash Mississippi 2013

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Yesterday was finally the day that I was able to run in the Warrior Dash, and the weather could not have been better.  It was 70 and sunny with a low humidity.  Susan and I drove down to Jackson on Friday night and stayed with some of her parent’s friends so we wouldn’t have to get up extremely early and drive down on Saturday.  I am very thankful for this option.  It saved us either dropping some cash on a hotel or logging a minimum of six hours of driving time.  I know a couple of people who have run a Warrior Dash before, but I was unable to speak to them prior top the event, so I was coming into this race relatively blind.  I had picked up some helpful hints from various blogs, but the best learning experience was to just get out there and run the race.

Fun Day

Fun Day

Warrior Dash made it very clear that there was no on site parking, but rather you park at a designated area and get shuttled to the event site.  For those of us that ran in Mississippi, it meant we parked at the Veterans Memorial Stadium (home of the Jackson State Tigers) and rode in school buses or limos to Mississippi Offroad Adventures, which was about eleven miles away.  I had read on several blogs that the wait for the shuttles was terrible, but we were able to get on one almost immediately.  I guess it was because we got there early (8:30 am).  We also had no wait on the shuttle home, but the shuttle that left right before us broke down on the interstate.  Susan and I were very happy to not be on that bus.  Once we turned onto the road to the venue, I was glad not to be fighting thousands of people to go up and down this narrow gravel road.  Out elven mile drive took nearly 40 minutes.  They are getting us back for no wait to board the shuttles, I suppose.  We were fortunate enough to be in a stretch H2 limo, or so we thought.  Since we were in the limo, we had stop about a mile or so before the loading area for the buses and walk to the event.  Susan was not pleased about this, especially as we passed an area were participants were being allowed to park their cars, for free (instead of the $10 we were charged).  I looked at one of the cars and it said “Warrior Dash VIP Parking Pass” and I just assumed it was for race day personnel.  That is, until, I saw the car owner dressed to race and putting his free t-shirt and hat into the car.  I have not been able to find how to get this perk, but I’ll keep digging.  I assume it has something to do with the St. Jude Warrior Program.

Lines, lots & lots of lines

Lines, lots & lots of lines

Once we got to the event, I saw what was going to be a recurring theme for the day, lines.  Everywhere you looked, there was a line of people waiting.  And this would not change for the rest of the day.  The did break up check-in into male and female lines, broken into four groups each in order to expedite the process, but they didn’t have enough people manning the lines.  With one person per line, it takes awhile to grab your packet with your bib and timing chip, your t-shirt, and your hat from three different boxes.  And add to this that my line was literally longer than the other three male lines combined, it took me 35 minutes to get my registration materials.  Once I finally got my stuff, I headed straight to the start line in hopes to make my wave time.  It was then that I realized that wave times do not matter whatsoever.  The guy next to me in line was registered for the 3:00 pm wave.  I got in line at 10:04 am.  I ran at 10:45 am.  This was kind of annoying, but they had roughly 250 people running every 15 minutes versus 500 running every 30 minutes.  This was a good idea to help with course traffic, but the later in the day it gets, the more congested the track becomes.  I was shocked by the amount of people who walk the entire course, as well as the amount that skip nearly every obstacle.  What is the point if you aren’t going to do the actual race?  I passed people who left 15 minutes before me within the first two minutes of running.

This is the first race photo that I have actually purchased.

This is the first race photo that I have actually purchased.

The course was very muddy, with several spots of deep mud and standing water.  The mud was nearly impossible to walk through and most people ran around the edges of it.  There were several people falling due to the slick mud and roots.  We probably ran through this for a mile before approaching the first obstacle.  The following is a list of the obstacles as we approached them and my thoughts on each:

The before & after pic

The before & after pic

  • Storming Normandy: low crawl under netting first & then barbed wire.  The first half you were crawling through mulch and sticks which was terrible.  Once the barbed wire started, you had to get very low, thus forcing most everybody to low crawl.  This obstacle took several minutes to complete because of the amount of people freaking out about touching the barbed wire.
  • Trenches: easy obstacle with no wait.  There was four trenches dug in the ground covered with plywood so they would be dark.  One of the four had standing water in the entire trench.
  • Barrier Breakdown: not ideal for short people.  The first wall was probably six feet tall, with the foot hold at four feet high.  You scaled four walls, only had to under one barrier, and then slid down a board at the end.  There was a moderate wait at this obstacle.
  • Muddy Mounds: I honestly thought this would be an easy obstacle & I was dead wrong.  You jump into a mud pit and then climb out.  Climbing on 15-20 feet of mud is very hard.  It is slick, and constantly moving.  The wait to clear this obstacle was very long.
  • Chained Up/Vicious Valleys: It wasn’t actually the website description of Chained Up, but rather a giant cargo net that led you to the Vicious Valleys.  The wait was excruciatingly long just to start this obstacle.  The cargo net part was easy, the valleys were not.  This was another obstacle where people short was a challenge.  Footholds on the valleys were more than six feet apart, so I slid down the board to each and did my best to climb.  One valley used ropes going between two boards.  I would guess that this was the most skipped obstacle on the course.
  • Iron Crossing: another obstacle that was not as advertised on the website.  It was a cargo net hanging that you scaled horizontally.  No wait at this obstacle.
  • Two X Fall:  I am not know for my gracefulness, so I was worried about this obstacle, but I completed it without an issue.  You walk on a narrow board with varying heights, clear a wall, walk on the board some more, clear another wall, and walk on the varying levels of the board some more.  All this while being sprayed by water.  There was no wait for this obstacle.
  • Capsized Catamaran: you climb over two sets of buoys in water about five feet deep.  There was no wait here.
  • Giant Cliffhanger: much harder than I was anticipating.  Imagine scaling a 20 foot wall covered in mud and then doing the same on the way down.  Add to the wall that to reach the ropes you had to run and jump (another problem for the vertically challenged competitors).  There was a very long wait for this obstacle, and the later in the day it gets, the harder it is to complete.
  • Warrior Roast: jump over fire.  The fire isn’t that high, it makes for a good photo, and there is no wait.
  • Muddy Mayhem: last obstacle to ensure that you are filthy at the end of the race.  It is a long crawl through thick mud and water.  There was no wait for this obstacle.

    Cliffhanger, Muddy MAyhem, Two X Fall, Warning Sign (upper left to bottom right)

    Giant Cliffhanger, Muddy Mayhem, Two X Fall, Warning Sign (upper left to bottom right)

All and all, it was a good course, and if you are able to get in the first wave, a person in moderately good shape can complete the entire course quickly.  There are some things that I learned from running in the event this year and some things I will do differently.  First, I had gloves, but they were not needed.  Second, there is no need to duct tape your shoes.  I tied mine tight and I never had an issue, even in the deep mud pits.  Third, run early.  The obstacles get bogged down and covered in mud as the day progresses.  Fourth, put a damp wash cloth in a zip lock bag.  It makes post race clean ups much easier.  There was no hose to clean participants, we all just got into a pond to wash off and then changed in the porta potty area.  Fifth, once home, spray your clothes down with a water hose until all the mud is gone.  This makes your life a lot easier.  Sixth, if you wear glasses, go ahead and wear them on the course.  They will get dirty, but they will survive the race.

Warrior Dash Swag

Warrior Dash Swag

Course: A: I liked all the mud, the obstacles, and the layout.  This was done well.

Swag: A: I like the buffalo hat, the shirt is very soft, and the medal is very functional since it is also a bottle opener.

Mud comes standard

Mud comes standard

Overall: B: The race is fun, with great obstacles, swag, and the ability to donate to St. Jude, but there are some logistical nightmares.  They should enforce wave times a little more, expedite the lines by having more staff dedicated to them, and make the layout of the site a little more free-flowing.  Registration should lead to gear check to the start line to avoid the congestion of people in the middle of the site.  But with the sheer number of participants, there are going to be issues.  I do look forward to doing this event again in the future, maybe even in Nashville in October.

The First Platinum Sombrero of the Year!

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Tonight, in the 9th inning of the Atlanta Braves – Pittsburgh Pirates game, Craig Kimbrel did what he does historically better than anyone else, strike guys out (he had an absurd 16.7 strikeouts per 9 innings pitched last year).  The second batter of the inning was Starling Marte.  Marte had struck out three times against Braves starter Julio Teheran. He added a fourth against Anthony Varvaro in the sixth inning.  So coming into the ninth inning, the chances of the first platinum sombrero of the season was good.  And the combo of Kimbrel and Marte did not disappoint, delivering the sombrero in four pitches!  I was just happy that the first platinum sombrero was delivered by the Braves pitchers, not one of their hitters.  Now, I have to think of a good giveaway to do for my registered runners each time this happens.  I will ponder this and get back to you.  In the meantime, please register for my race and help the children of St. Jude.

This is still primarily a running blog, but with the theme of my event and my favorite baseball team delivering the platinum sombrero, I had to update about it.  Now it is TRX time to stay prepared for the Warrior Dash this weekend.

Platinum Sombrero Sponsor #6

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KT Tape is the sixth sponsor for the Platinum Sombrero 5K.  The Memphis Tigers have been using KT Tape for years now and I have been very curious about it, so I am thrilled to get a sample to try.  KT Tape will be providing a product sample to the first 50 people to register for the race.  For those of you who don’t know what KT Tape is, it simply is an alternative to bulky braces, wraps, and pain meds.  It is “…an alternative that’s used clinically, athlete tested, and used by millions of people world-wide. It’s called KT Tape. KT Tape is lightweight, comfortable to wear, and used to treat and prevent hundreds of common injuries such as knee pain, shin splints, and tennis elbow.”  You can find more info by liking them on Facebook.

Sponsor #6

Sponsor #6

I’m sure that you have seen an athlete somewhere using KT Tape, especially if you watch basketball or the Olympics (think Kerri Walsh and beach volleyball).  I didn’t even know the stuff was available to the public until recently, and now I’m thinking that maybe I could have incorporated it into my peroneal tendonitis rehab.

Platinum Sombrero Sponsor #5

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Sponsors are piling up fast! The fifth sponsor is Bulu Box, which is a company that sends you an assortment of vitamins, supplements, and health products monthly so you can try these products at a low cost to see if they will work for you.  Each month, the products change, and there are several different subscription options.  They also reward you for reviewing products that you sample with a points system that can be redeemed on their site.  Bulu Box has agreed to give each race participant one free box or $10 off a subscription.  I will email out the promo code once registration has closed, and flyer will give you a step by step account of how to redeem the code.  Go like them on Facebook.

Sponsor #5

Sponsor #5

When ordering a box from Bulu Box, shipping is free, and you can sign up for a single month, three month, six month, or a one year subscription (with a $10 discount) to have these high end samples delivered to your door.  There is even a weight loss box option!  Check out some of the premium brands featured here.